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Majjhima Nikāya

MN78: Samaṇamuṇḍikasutta - With Uggāhamāna Samaṇamuṇḍika

1Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was living at Sāvatthī in Jeta's Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika's Park. Now on that occasion the wanderer Uggāhamāna Samaṇamaṇḍikāputta was staying in Mallikā's Park, the single-halled Tinduka plantation for philosophical debates,[n.771] MA: The park had been built by Queen Mallikā, the wife of King Pasenadi of Kosala, and beautified with flower trees and fruit trees. At first only one hall was built, which accounts for its name, but afterwards many halls were built. Various companies of brahmins and wanderers would assemble here to expound and discuss their doctrines. together with a large following of wanderers, with as many as three hundred wanderers.

The carpenter Pañcakanga went out from Sāvatthī at midday in order to see the Blessed One. Then he thought: "It is not the right time to see the Blessed One; he is still in retreat. And it is not the right time to see bhikkhus worthy of esteem; they are still in retreat. Suppose I went to Mallikā's Park, to the wanderer Uggāhamaā̄na Samaṇamaṇḍikāputta?" And he went to Mallikā's Park.

2Now on that occasion the wanderer Uggāhamāna was seated with a large assembly of wanderers who were making an uproar, loudly and noisily talking many kinds of pointless talk,Tiracchānakathā. Many translators render this expression as "animal talk." However, tiracchāna means literally "going horizontally," and though this term is used as a designation for animals, MA explains that in the present context it means talk that goes "horizontally" or "perpendicularly" to the path leading to heaven and liberation. such as talk of kings, robbers, ministers, armies, dangers, battles, food, drink, clothing, beds, garlands, perfumes, relatives, vehicles, villages, towns, cities, countries, women, heroes, streets, wells, the dead, trifles, the origin of the world, the origin of the sea, whether things are so or are not so.


3The wanderer Uggāhamāna Samaṇamaṇḍikāputta saw the carpenter Pañcakanga coming in the distance. Seeing him, he quieted his own assembly thus: "Sirs, be quiet; sirs make no noise. Here comes the carpenter Pañcakanga, a disciple of the recluse Gotama, one of the recluse Gotama's white-clothed lay disciples staying at Sāvatthī. These venerable ones like quiet; they are disciplined in quiet; they commend quiet. Perhaps if he finds our assembly a quiet one, he will think to join us." Then the wanderers became silent.

4The carpenter Pañcakanga went to the wanderer Uggāhamāna and exchanged greetings with him. When this courteous and amiable talk was finished, he sat down at one side. The wanderer Uggāhamāna then said to him:

"Carpenter, when a man possesses four qualities, I describe him as accomplished in what is wholesome, perfected in what is wholesome, an ascetic invincible attained to the supreme attainment. What are the four? Here he does no evil bodily actions, he utters no evil speech, he has no evil intentions, and he does not make his living by any evil livelihood. When a man possesses these four qualities, I describe him as accomplished in what is wholesome, perfected in what is wholesome, an ascetic invincible attained to the supreme attainment."

5Then the carpenter Pañcakanga neither approved nor disapproved of the wanderer Uggāhamāna's words. Without doing either he rose from his seat and went away, thinking: "I shall learn the meaning of this statement in the presence of the Blessed One."

Then he went to the Blessed One, and after paying homage to him, he sat down at one side and reported to the Blessed One his entire conversation with the wanderer Uggāhamāna. Thereupon the Blessed One said:

6"If that were so, carpenter, then a young tender infant lying prone is accomplished in what is wholesome, perfected in what is wholesome, an ascetic invincible attained to the supreme attainment, according to the wanderer Uggāhamāna's statement. For a young tender infant lying prone does not even have the notion ‘body,’ so how should he do an evil bodily action beyond mere wriggling? A young tender infant lying prone does not even have the notion ‘speech,’ so how should he utter evil speech beyond mere whining? A young tender infant lying prone does not even have the notion ‘intention,’ so how should he have evil intentions beyond mere sulking? A young tender infant lying prone does not even have the notion ‘livelihood,’ so how should he make his living by evil livelihood beyond being suckled at his mother's breast? If that were so, carpenter, then a young tender infant lying prone is accomplished in what is wholesome … according to the wanderer Uggāhamāna's statement.

7"When a man possesses four qualities, carpenter, I describe him, not as accomplished in what is wholesome or perfected in what is wholesome or an ascetic invincible attained to the supreme attainment, but as one who stands in the same category as the young tender infant lying prone. What are the four? Here he does no evil bodily actions, he utters no evil speech, he has no evil intentions, and he does not make his living by any evil livelihood. When a man possesses these four qualities, I describe him, not as accomplished … but as one who stands in the same category as the young tender infant lying prone.

8"When a man possesses ten qualities, carpenter, I describe him as accomplished in what is wholesome, perfected in what is wholesome, an ascetic invincible attained to the supreme attainment. But first of all I say, it must be understood thus:[n.772] MA: First the Buddha shows the plane of the arahant, the one beyond training (i.e., by mentioning the ten qualities), then he sets up an outline applicable to the sekha, the disciple in higher training. The word rendered as "habits" is sīla, which in some contexts can assume a wider range of meaning than "virtue." ‘These are unwholesome habits,’ and thus: ‘Unwholesome habits originate from this,’ and thus: ‘Unwholesome habits cease without remainder here,’ and thus: ‘One practising in this way is practising the way to the cessation of unwholesome habits.’

9And I say, it must be understood thus: ‘These are wholesome habits,’ and thus: ‘Wholesome habits originate from this,’ and thus: ‘Wholesome habits cease without remainder here,’ and thus: ‘One practising in this way is practising the way to the cessation of wholesome habits.’

10And I say, it must be understood thus: ‘These are unwholesome intentions,’ and thus: ‘Unwholesome intentions originate from this,’ and thus: ‘Unwholesome intentions cease without remainder here,’ and thus: ‘One practising in this way is practising the way to the cessation of unwholesome intentions.’

11And I say, it must be understood thus: ‘These are wholesome intentions,’ and thus: ‘Wholesome intentions originate from this,’ and thus: ‘Wholesome intentions cease without remainder here,’ and thus: ‘One practising in this way is practising the way to the cessation of wholesome intentions.’


12"What are unwholesome habits? They are unwholesome bodily actions, unwholesome verbal actions, and evil livelihood. These are called unwholesome habits.

13"And what do these unwholesome habits originate from? Their origin is stated: they should be said to originate from mind. What mind? Though mind is multiple, varied, and of different aspects, there is mind affected by lust, by hate, and by delusion. Unwholesome habits originate from this.

14"And where do these unwholesome habits cease without remainder? Their cessation is stated: here a bhikkhu abandons bodily misconduct and develops good bodily conduct; he abandons verbal misconduct and develops good verbal conduct; he abandons mental misconduct and develops good mental conduct; he abandons wrong livelihood and gains a living by right livelihood. [n.773] MA explains that this refers to the fruit of stream-entry, for it is at that point that the virtue of restraint by the Pāṭimokkha is fulfilled (and, for a lay Buddhist, the observance of the Five Precepts). MA will also explain the subsequent passages by reference to the other supramundane paths and fruits. Although the text of the sutta does not expressly mention these attainments, the commentarial interpretation seems to be justified by the expression "cease without remainder" (aparisesā nirujjhanti), for it is only with the attainment of the respective paths and fruits that a total cessation of the particular defilement occurs. The commentary's view is further supported by the culmination of the entire discourse in the figure of the arahant. It is here that unwholesome habits cease without remainder.

15"And how practising does he practise the way to the cessation of unwholesome habits? Here a bhikkhu awakens zeal for the non-arising of unarisen evil unwholesome states and he makes effort, arouses energy, exerts his mind, and strives. He awakens zeal for the abandoning of arisen evil unwholesome states … He awakens zeal for the arising of unarisen wholesome states … He awakens zeal for the continuance, non-disappearance, strengthening, increase, and fulfilment by development of arisen wholesome states, and he makes effort, arouses energy, exerts his mind, and strives. One so practising practises the way to the cessation of unwholesome habits.[n.774] MA: As far as the path of stream-entry he is said to be practising for their cessation; when he has attained the fruit of stream-entry they are said to have ceased.


16"What are wholesome habits? They are wholesome bodily actions, wholesome verbal actions, and purification of livelihood. These are called wholesome habits.

17"And what do these wholesome habits originate from? Their origin is stated: they should be said to originate from mind. What mind? Though mind is multiple, varied, and of different aspects, there is mind unaffected by lust, by hate, or by delusion. Wholesome habits originate from this.

18"And where do these wholesome habits cease without remainder? Their cessation is stated: here a bhikkhu is virtuous, but he does not identify with his virtue, and he understands as it actually is that deliverance of mind and deliverance by wisdom where these wholesome habits cease without remainder.[n.775] This passage shows the arahant, who maintains virtuous conduct but no longer identifies with his virtue by conceiving it as "I" and "mine." Since his virtuous habits no longer generate kamma, they are not describable as "wholesome."

19"And how practising does he practise the way to the cessation of wholesome habits? Here a bhikkhu awakens zeal for the non-arising of unarisen evil unwholesome states … for the continuance, non-disappearance, strengthening, increase, and fulfilment by development of arisen wholesome states, and he makes effort, arouses energy, exerts his mind, and strives. One so practising practises the way to the cessation of wholesome habits.[n.776] MA: As far as the path of arahantship he is said to be practising for their cessation; when he has attained the fruit of arahantship they are said to have ceased.


20"What are unwholesome intentions? They are the intention of sensual desire, the intention of ill will, and the intention of cruelty. These are called unwholesome intentions.

21"And what do these unwholesome intentions originate from? Their origin is stated: they should be said to originate from perception. What perception? Though perception is multiple, varied, and of different aspects, there is perception of sensual desire, perception of ill will, and perception of cruelty. Unwholesome intentions originate from this.

22"And where do these unwholesome intentions cease without remainder? Their cessation is stated: here, quite secluded from sensual pleasures, secluded from unwholesome states, a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the first jhāna, which is accompanied by applied and sustained thought, with rapture and pleasure born of seclusion. It is here that unwholesome intentions cease without remainder .[n.777] MA: This refers to the first jhāna pertaining to the fruit of non-returning. The path of non-returning eradicates sensual desire and ill will, and thus prevents any future arising of the three unwholesome intentions — those of sensual desire, ill will, and cruelty.

23"And how practising does he practise the way to the cessation of unwholesome intentions? Here a bhikkhu awakens zeal for the non-arising of unarisen evil unwholesome states … for the continuance, non-disappearance, strengthening, increase, and fulfilment by development of arisen wholesome states, and he makes effort, arouses energy, exerts his mind, and strives. One so practising practises the way to the cessation of unwholesome intentions.[n.778] MA: As far as the path of non-returning he is said to be practising for their cessation; when he has attained the fruit of non-returning they are said to have ceased.


24"What are wholesome intentions? They are the intention of renunciation, the intention of non-ill will, and the intention of non-cruelty. These are called wholesome intentions.

25"And what do these wholesome intentions originate from? Their origin is stated: they should be said to originate from perception. What perception? Though perception is multiple, varied, and of different aspects, there is perception of renunciation, perception of non-ill will, and perception of non-cruelty. Wholesome intentions originate from this.

26"And where do these wholesome intentions cease without remainder? Their cessation is stated: here with the stilling of applied and sustained thought, a bhikkhu enters upon and abides in the second jhāna, which has self-confidence and singleness of mind without applied and sustained thought, with rapture and pleasure born of concentration. It is here that these wholesome intentions cease without remainder.[n.779] MA: This refers to the second jhāna pertaining to the fruit of arahantship.

27"And how practising does he practise the way to the cessation of wholesome intentions? Here a bhikkhu awakens zeal for the non-arising of unarisen evil unwholesome states … for the continuance, non-disappearance, strengthening, increase, and fulfilment by development of arisen wholesome states, and he makes effort, arouses energy, exerts his mind, and strives. One so practising practises the way to the cessation of wholesome intentions.[n.780] MA: As far as the path of arahantship he is said to be practising for their cessation; when he has obtained the fruit of arahantship they are said to have ceased. The virtuous intentions of the arahant are not described as "wholesome."

28"Now, carpenter, when a man possesses what ten qualities do I describe him as accomplished in what is wholesome, perfected in what is wholesome, an ascetic invincible attained to the supreme attainment? Here a bhikkhu possesses the right view of one beyond training,[n.781] See MN 65.34. the right intention of one beyond training, the right speech of one beyond training, the right action of one beyond training, the right livelihood of one beyond training, the right effort of one beyond training, the right mindfulness of one beyond training, the right concentration of one beyond training, the right knowledge of one beyond training, and the right deliverance of one beyond training. When a man possesses these ten qualities, I describe him as accomplished in what is wholesome, perfected in what is wholesome, an ascetic invincible attained to the supreme attainment."

29That is what the Blessed One said. The carpenter Pañcakanga was satisfied and delighted in the Blessed One's words.

1Evaṁ me sutaṁ — ​ ekaṁ samayaṁ bhagavā sāvatthiyaṁ viharati jetavane anāthapiṇḍikassa ārāme. Tena kho pana samayena uggāhamāno paribbājako samaṇamuṇḍikāputto samayappavādake tindukācīre ekasālake mallikāya ārāme paṭivasati mahatiyā paribbājakaparisāya saddhiṁ pañcamattehi paribbājakasatehi.

Atha kho pañcakaṅgo thapati sāvatthiyā nikkhami divā divassa bhagavantaṁ dassanāya. Atha kho pañcakaṅgassa thapatissa etadahosi: "akālo kho tāva bhagavantaṁ dassanāya; paṭisallīno bhagavā. Manobhāvaniyānampi bhikkhūnaṁ asamayo dassanāya; paṭisallīnā manobhāvaniyā bhikkhū. Yannūnāhaṁ yena samayappavādako tindukācīro ekasālako mallikāya ārāmo yena uggāhamāno paribbājako samaṇamuṇḍikāputto tenupasaṅkameyyan"ti. Atha kho pañcakaṅgo thapati yena samayappavādako tindukācīro ekasālako mallikāya ārāmo yena uggāhamāno paribbājako samaṇamuṇḍikāputto tenupasaṅkami.

2Tena kho pana samayena uggāhamāno paribbājako samaṇamuṇḍikāputto mahatiyā paribbājakaparisāya saddhiṁ nisinno hoti unnādiniyā uccāsaddamahāsaddāya anekavihitaṁ tiracchānakathaṁ kathentiyā, seyyathidaṁ — rājakathaṁ corakathaṁ mahāmattakathaṁ senākathaṁ bhayakathaṁ yuddhakathaṁ annakathaṁ pānakathaṁ vatthakathaṁ sayanakathaṁ mālākathaṁ gandhakathaṁ ñātikathaṁ yānakathaṁ gāmakathaṁ nigamakathaṁ nagarakathaṁ janapadakathaṁ itthikathaṁ sūrakathaṁ visikhākathaṁ kumbhaṭṭhānakathaṁ pubbapetakathaṁ nānattakathaṁ lokakkhāyikaṁ samuddakkhāyikaṁ itibhavābhavakathaṁ iti vā.


3Addasā kho uggāhamāno paribbājako samaṇamuṇḍikāputto pañcakaṅgaṁ thapatiṁ dūratova āgacchantaṁ. Disvāna sakaṁ parisaṁ saṇṭhāpesi: "appasaddā bhonto hontu, mā bhonto saddamakattha; ayaṁ samaṇassa gotamassa sāvako āgacchati pañcakaṅgo thapati. Yāvatā kho pana samaṇassa gotamassa sāvakā gihī odātavasanā sāvatthiyaṁ paṭivasanti ayaṁ tesaṁ aññataro pañcakaṅgo thapati. Appasaddakāmā kho pana te āyasmanto appasaddavinītā appasaddassa vaṇṇavādino; appeva nāma appasaddaṁ parisaṁ viditvā upasaṅkamitabbaṁ maññeyyā"ti. Atha kho te paribbājakā tuṇhī ahesuṁ.

4Atha kho pañcakaṅgo thapati yena uggāhamāno paribbājako samaṇamuṇḍikāputto tenupasaṅkami; upasaṅkamitvā uggāhamānena paribbājakena samaṇamuṇḍikāputtena saddhiṁ sammodi. Sammodanīyaṁ kathaṁ sāraṇīyaṁ vītisāretvā ekamantaṁ nisīdi. Ekamantaṁ nisinnaṁ kho pañcakaṅgaṁ thapatiṁ uggāhamāno paribbājako samaṇamuṇḍikāputto etadavoca:

" catūhi kho ahaṁ, gahapati, dhammehi samannāgataṁ purisapuggalaṁ paññapemi sampannakusalaṁ paramakusalaṁ uttamapattipattaṁ samaṇaṁ ayojjhaṁ. Katamehi catūhi? Idha, gahapati, na kāyena pāpakammaṁ karoti, na pāpakaṁ vācaṁ bhāsati, na pāpakaṁ saṅkappaṁ saṅkappeti, na pāpakaṁ ājīvaṁ ājīvati — imehi kho ahaṁ, gahapati, catūhi dhammehi samannāgataṁ purisapuggalaṁ paññapemi sampannakusalaṁ paramakusalaṁ uttamapattipattaṁ samaṇaṁ ayojjhan"ti.

5Atha kho pañcakaṅgo thapati uggāhamānassa paribbājakassa samaṇamuṇḍikāputtassa bhāsitaṁ neva abhinandi nappaṭikkosi. Anabhinanditvā appaṭikkositvā uṭṭhāyāsanā pakkāmi: "Bhagavato santike etassa bhāsitassa atthaṁ ājānissāmī"ti.

Atha kho pañcakaṅgo thapati yena bhagavā tenupasaṅkami; upasaṅkamitvā bhagavantaṁ abhivādetvā ekamantaṁ nisīdi. Ekamantaṁ nisinno kho pañcakaṅgo thapati yāvatako ahosi uggāhamānena paribbājakena samaṇamuṇḍikāputtena saddhiṁ kathāsallāpo taṁ sabbaṁ bhagavato ārocesi.

6Evaṁ vutte, bhagavā pañcakaṅgaṁ thapatiṁ etadavoca: "evaṁ sante kho, thapati, daharo kumāro mando uttānaseyyako sampannakusalo bhavissati paramakusalo uttamapattipatto samaṇo ayojjho, yathā uggāhamānassa paribbājakassa samaṇamuṇḍikāputtassa vacanaṁ. Dāhārassa hi, thapati, kumārassa mandassa uttānaseyyakassa kāyotipi na hoti, kuto pana kāyena pāpakammaṁ karissati, aññatra phanditamattā. Dāhārassa hi, thapati, kumārassa mandassa uttānaseyyakassa vācātipi na hoti, kuto pana pāpakaṁ vācaṁ bhāsissati, aññatra roditamattā. Dāhārassa hi, thapati, kumārassa mandassa uttānaseyyakassa saṅkappotipi na hoti, kuto pana pāpakaṁ saṅkappaṁ saṅkappissati, aññatra vikūjitamattā. Dāhārassa hi, thapati, kumārassa mandassa uttānaseyyakassa ājīvotipi na hoti, kuto pana pāpakaṁ ājīvaṁ ājīvissati, aññatra mātuthaññā. Evaṁ sante kho, thapati, daharo kumāro mando uttānaseyyako sampannakusalo bhavissati paramakusalo uttamapattipatto samaṇo ayojjho, yathā uggāhamānassa paribbājakassa samaṇamuṇḍikāputtassa vacanaṁ.

7Catūhi kho ahaṁ, thapati, dhammehi samannāgataṁ purisapuggalaṁ paññapemi na ceva sampannakusalaṁ na paramakusalaṁ na uttamapattipattaṁ samaṇaṁ ayojjhaṁ, api cimaṁ dāhāraṁ kumāraṁ mandaṁ uttānaseyyakaṁ samadhigayha tiṭṭhati. Katamehi catūhi? Idha, thapati, na kāyena pāpakammaṁ karoti, na pāpakaṁ vācaṁ bhāsati, na pāpakaṁ saṅkappaṁ saṅkappeti, na pāpakaṁ ājīvaṁ ājīvati — imehi kho ahaṁ, thapati, catūhi dhammehi samannāgataṁ purisapuggalaṁ paññapemi na ceva sampannakusalaṁ na paramakusalaṁ na uttamapattipattaṁ samaṇaṁ ayojjhaṁ, api cimaṁ dāhāraṁ kumāraṁ mandaṁ uttānaseyyakaṁ samadhigayha tiṭṭhati.

8Dasahi kho ahaṁ, thapati, dhammehi samannāgataṁ purisapuggalaṁ paññapemi sampannakusalaṁ paramakusalaṁ uttamapattipattaṁ samaṇaṁ ayojjhaṁ. Ime akusalā sīlā; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Itosamuṭṭhānā akusalā sīlā; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Idha akusalā sīlā aparisesā nirujjhanti; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Evaṁ paṭipanno akusalānaṁ sīlānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi.

9Ime kusalā sīlā; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Itosamuṭṭhānā kusalā sīlā; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Idha kusalā sīlā aparisesā nirujjhanti; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Evaṁ paṭipanno kusalānaṁ sīlānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi.

10Ime akusalā saṅkappā; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Itosamuṭṭhānā akusalā saṅkappā; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Idha akusalā saṅkappā aparisesā nirujjhanti; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Evaṁ paṭipanno akusalānaṁ saṅkappānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi.

11Ime kusalā saṅkappā; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Itosamuṭṭhānā kusalā saṅkappā; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Idha kusalā saṅkappā aparisesā nirujjhanti; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi. Evaṁ paṭipanno kusalānaṁ saṅkappānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti; tamahaṁ, thapati, veditabbanti vadāmi.


12Katame ca, thapati, akusalā sīlā? Akusalaṁ kāyakammaṁ, akusalaṁ vacīkammaṁ, pāpako ājīvo — ime vuccanti, thapati, akusalā sīlā.

13Ime ca, thapati, akusalā sīlā kiṁsamuṭṭhānā? Samuṭṭhānampi nesaṁ vuttaṁ. ‘Cittasamuṭṭhānā’tissa vacanīyaṁ. Katamaṁ cittaṁ? Cittampi hi bahuṁ anekavidhaṁ nānappakārakaṁ. Yaṁ cittaṁ sarāgaṁ sadosaṁ samohaṁ, itosamuṭṭhānā akusalā sīlā.

14Ime ca, thapati, akusalā sīlā kuhiṁ aparisesā nirujjhanti? Nirodhopi nesaṁ vutto. Idha, thapati, bhikkhu kāyaduccaritaṁ pahāya kāyasucaritaṁ bhāveti, vacīduccaritaṁ pahāya vacīsucaritaṁ bhāveti, manoduccaritaṁ pahāya manosucaritaṁ bhāveti, micchājīvaṁ pahāya sammājīvena jīvitaṁ kappeti — etthete akusalā sīlā aparisesā nirujjhanti.

15Kathaṁ paṭipanno, thapati, akusalānaṁ sīlānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti? Idha, thapati, bhikkhu anuppannānaṁ pāpakānaṁ akusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ anuppādāya chandaṁ janeti vāyamati vīriyaṁ ārabhati cittaṁ paggaṇhāti padahati; uppannānaṁ pāpakānaṁ akusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ pahānāya chandaṁ janeti vāyamati vīriyaṁ ārabhati cittaṁ paggaṇhāti padahati; anuppannānaṁ kusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ uppādāya chandaṁ janeti vāyamati vīriyaṁ ārabhati cittaṁ paggaṇhāti padahati; uppannānaṁ kusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ ṭhitiyā asammosāya bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya bhāvanāya pāripūriyā chandaṁ janeti vāyamati vīriyaṁ ārabhati cittaṁ paggaṇhāti padahati. Evaṁ paṭipanno kho, thapati, akusalānaṁ sīlānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti.


16Katame ca, thapati, kusalā sīlā? Kusalaṁ kāyakammaṁ, kusalaṁ vacīkammaṁ, ājīvaparisuddhampi kho ahaṁ, thapati, sīlasmiṁ vadāmi. Ime vuccanti, thapati, kusalā sīlā.

17Ime ca, thapati, kusalā sīlā kiṁsamuṭṭhānā? Samuṭṭhānampi nesaṁ vuttaṁ. ‘Cittasamuṭṭhānā’tissa vacanīyaṁ. Katamaṁ cittaṁ? Cittampi hi bahuṁ anekavidhaṁ nānappakārakaṁ. Yaṁ cittaṁ vītarāgaṁ vītadosaṁ vītamohaṁ, itosamuṭṭhānā kusalā sīlā.

18Ime ca, thapati, kusalā sīlā kuhiṁ aparisesā nirujjhanti? Nirodhopi nesaṁ vutto. Idha, thapati, bhikkhu sīlavā hoti no ca sīlamayo, tañca cetovimuttiṁ paññāvimuttiṁ yathābhūtaṁ pajānāti; yatthassa te kusalā sīlā aparisesā nirujjhanti.

19Kathaṁ paṭipanno ca, thapati, kusalānaṁ sīlānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti? Idha, thapati, bhikkhu anuppannānaṁ pāpakānaṁ akusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ anuppādāya chandaṁ janeti vāyamati vīriyaṁ ārabhati cittaṁ paggaṇhāti padahati; uppannānaṁ pāpakānaṁ akusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ pahānāya … pe … anuppannānaṁ kusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ uppādāya … pe … uppannānaṁ kusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ ṭhitiyā asammosāya bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya bhāvanāya pāripūriyā chandaṁ janeti vāyamati vīriyaṁ ārabhati cittaṁ paggaṇhāti padahati. Evaṁ paṭipanno kho, thapati, kusalānaṁ sīlānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti.


20Katame ca, thapati, akusalā saṅkappā? Kāmasaṅkappo, byāpādasaṅkappo, vihiṁsāsaṅkappo — ime vuccanti, thapati, akusalā saṅkappā.

21Ime ca, thapati, akusalā saṅkappā kiṁsamuṭṭhānā? Samuṭṭhānampi nesaṁ vuttaṁ. ‘Saññāsamuṭṭhānā’tissa vacanīyaṁ. Katamā saññā? Saññāpi hi bahū anekavidhā nānappakārakā. Kāmasaññā, byāpādasaññā, vihiṁsāsaññā — itosamuṭṭhānā akusalā saṅkappā.

22Ime ca, thapati, akusalā saṅkappā kuhiṁ aparisesā nirujjhanti? Nirodhopi nesaṁ vutto. Idha, thapati, bhikkhu vivicceva kāmehi … pe … paṭhamaṁ jhānaṁ upasampajja viharati; etthete akusalā saṅkappā aparisesā nirujjhanti.

23Kathaṁ paṭipanno ca, thapati, akusalānaṁ saṅkappānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti? Idha, thapati, bhikkhu anuppannānaṁ pāpakānaṁ akusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ anuppādāya chandaṁ janeti vāyamati vīriyaṁ ārabhati cittaṁ paggaṇhāti padahati; uppannānaṁ pāpakānaṁ akusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ pahānāya … pe … anuppannānaṁ kusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ uppādāya … pe … uppannānaṁ kusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ ṭhitiyā asammosāya bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya bhāvanāya pāripūriyā chandaṁ janeti vāyamati vīriyaṁ ārabhati cittaṁ paggaṇhāti padahati. Evaṁ paṭipanno kho, thapati, akusalānaṁ saṅkappānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti.


24Katame ca, thapati, kusalā saṅkappā? Nekkhammasaṅkappo, abyāpādasaṅkappo, avihiṁsāsaṅkappo — ime vuccanti, thapati, kusalā saṅkappā.

25Ime ca, thapati, kusalā saṅkappā kiṁsamuṭṭhānā? Samuṭṭhānampi nesaṁ vuttaṁ. ‘Saññāsamuṭṭhānā’tissa vacanīyaṁ. Katamā saññā? Saññāpi hi bahū anekavidhā nānappakārakā. Nekkhammasaññā, abyāpādasaññā, avihiṁsāsaññā — itosamuṭṭhānā kusalā saṅkappā.

26Ime ca, thapati, kusalā saṅkappā kuhiṁ aparisesā nirujjhanti? Nirodhopi nesaṁ vutto. Idha, thapati, bhikkhu vitakkavicārānaṁ vūpasamā … pe … dutiyaṁ jhānaṁ upasampajja viharati; etthete kusalā saṅkappā aparisesā nirujjhanti.

27Kathaṁ paṭipanno ca, thapati, kusalānaṁ saṅkappānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti? Idha, thapati, bhikkhu anuppannānaṁ pāpakānaṁ akusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ anuppādāya chandaṁ janeti vāyamati vīriyaṁ ārabhati cittaṁ paggaṇhāti padahati; uppannānaṁ pāpakānaṁ akusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ pahānāya … pe … anuppannānaṁ kusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ uppādāya … pe … uppannānaṁ kusalānaṁ dhammānaṁ ṭhitiyā asammosāya bhiyyobhāvāya vepullāya bhāvanāya pāripūriyā chandaṁ janeti vāyamati vīriyaṁ ārabhati cittaṁ paggaṇhāti padahati. Evaṁ paṭipanno kho, thapati, kusalānaṁ saṅkappānaṁ nirodhāya paṭipanno hoti.

28Katamehi cāhaṁ, thapati, dasahi dhammehi samannāgataṁ purisapuggalaṁ paññapemi sampannakusalaṁ paramakusalaṁ uttamapattipattaṁ samaṇaṁ ayojjhaṁ? Idha, thapati, bhikkhu asekhāya sammādiṭṭhiyā samannāgato hoti, asekhena sammāsaṅkappena samannāgato hoti, asekhāya sammāvācāya samannāgato hoti, asekhena sammākammantena samannāgato hoti, asekhena sammāājīvena samannāgato hoti, asekhena sammāvāyāmena samannāgato hoti, asekhāya sammāsatiyā samannāgato hoti, asekhena sammāsamādhinā samannāgato hoti, asekhena sammāñāṇena samannāgato hoti, asekhāya sammāvimuttiyā samannāgato hoti — imehi kho ahaṁ, thapati, dasahi dhammehi samannāgataṁ purisapuggalaṁ paññapemi sampannakusalaṁ paramakusalaṁ uttamapattipattaṁ samaṇaṁ ayojjhan"ti.

29Idamavoca bhagavā. Attamano pañcakaṅgo thapati bhagavato bhāsitaṁ abhinandīti.

Samaṇamuṇḍikasuttaṁ niṭṭhitaṁ aṭṭhamaṁ.